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Famous American climber fell into a crevasse in the mountains of Nepal: the rescue operation continues

Renowned American ski climber Hilary Nelson has gone missing while hiking in the Himalayas after she apparently fell into a 600-meter-high crevasse. TheGuardian.

Photo: IStock

Nelson and her partner Jim Morrison climbed the summit of Mount Manaslu on September 26 in the morning. 8 163 meters. Jiban Ghimire of Shangri-La Nepal Treks, who organized the expedition, told Outside Magazine that the pair reached the summit at 11:30 am local time.

 

“About 15 minutes later, I got a call from our base camp and was told that she slipped and fell on the other side of the peak,” he said.

Nelson apparently fell into a 600m deep crevasse as she and Morrison, along with their three guides, descended from the summit. Ghimir reported that the search work was delayed due to weather conditions, and "it takes three days to get to the scene from the base camp."

Also on September 26, an avalanche at the bottom of the mountain killed one climber and injured a dozen others.

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A spokesman for the Nepal Tourism Department said efforts to rescue Nelson may not be successful.

"Based on the briefings and the difficult terrain, it's really hard to say if we can save her," the official said.

North Face, Nelson's sponsor, said on September 26 that the company is "in touch with the Hilary family and is supporting the search and rescue efforts in every way possible."

On September 22, Nelson posted on Instagram about the difficult conditions she and Morrison faced on Manaslu, with heavy rain and humidity making climbing difficult.

“I never felt as confident on the mountain as I did in past adventures in the rarefied atmosphere of the high Himalayas,” she wrote. “These last weeks have tested my resilience in a new way.”

Manaslu, the eighth highest mountain in the world. According to Outside Magazine, the Nepalese government has issued 404 fall climbing permits, up from 150 last year. Although the mountain is considered one of the highest peaks and the easiest to climb, its massive avalanches have proven deadly: in 2012, an avalanche claimed the lives of eight climbers.

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Nelson, 49, who has two children, is one of the world's most famous ski climbers, with a career spanning two decades. On their website, the North Face describes her as "the most successful climber of her generation." In 2012, she became the first woman to summit Everest and the summit of neighboring Mount Lhotse in 24 hours.

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